Necessary Information We Need To Know About Flu In Cats

0
249

There are so many illnesses that may affect both humans and animals. One of which is flu. As a matter of fact, this condition, even though it may seem unbelievable, may affect cats. Flu in cats actually is a case that you need to watch out for. Get to learn more about this feline illness –read on to this article!

Flu in Cats: What is this feline condition?

Flu in cats is actually used in describing the cold or any flu-like symptoms, which may accompany infection of the upper respiratory tract in the cats. The cats with this kind of condition may show signs, which include frequent sneezing, loss of appetite, depression, discharge from nose and eyes, as well as fever. This feline condition mostly affects the elderly cats and kittens, as well as the animals that are kept in crowded situations like shelter and immunocompromised or stressed cats.

In the event that the cat has recently been in contact with sick cats and shows some of the aforementioned symptoms, contact your vet for some examination and workup. The treatment options might depend, yet primarily be reassuring.

Causes of Cat Flu

There are a number of possible infectious causes of flu in cats, yet the two of the most common causes are FHV –feline herpesvirus or FCV –feline calicivirus. These each have causative agents and some of the common, more generalized symptoms include:

  • Depression
  • Dehydration
  • Loss of appetite
  • Eye and / or nasal discharge
  • Sneezing
  • Fever

FCV

  • Transient lameness
  • Mouth ulcers
  • General symptoms aforementioned

FLV

  • Coughing
  • Corneal ulceration
  • More austere eye discharge
  • General symptoms aforementioned

Chlamydia felis or Mycoplasma felis

  • Eye infection or discharge
  • Fever

Bordetella bronchiseptica

  • Cough
  • Nasal discharge
  • Sneezing
  • Fever

Symptoms of Cat Flu

As the term ‘flu in cats’ suggests, the signs and symptoms of the infection bear a resemblance to flu or cold, as well as the following:

  • Depression
  • Dehydration
  • Temporary lameness
  • Loss of appetite
  • Eye ulcers
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Salivation
  • Eye discharge
  • Nasal discharge
  • Frequent sneezing
  • Coughing
  • Fever

The symptoms of flu in cats might have some variation according to the causative agent.

Prognosis of Cat Flu

In the event that a cat is showing some symptoms of flu, give your vet a call. He or she will conduct a physical examination, as well as gather a thorough history of the cat. The vet will then want to know whether or not the cat has recently came in contact with some other cats or if it came from an animal shelter. The examination may include checking the nose, eyes, and mouth f0or some symptoms of inflammation and ulcers. In order to check for ulcers, the vet might use fluorescein dye/ a presumptive prognosis may be made on the visible signs. Most of the treatments may be based on the symptoms observed.

Even though the treatments may be started according to the probable prognosis, the vet might gather samples like swabs around the throat or eyes. Additionally, a cell scraping from the eye lining nose, or the inside of the mouth, or samples from the nose or eye discharges. The swabs and the scrapings may be used in identifying or culturing for Bordetella, Chlamydia, or Mycoplasma. On the other hand, the discharge samples might be essential in testing for the presence of antibodies to FCV or FHV. In the event that the cat seems to have hasty or hard breathing, the vet might want to take an x-ray, in order to check for some possible evidences of pneumonia.

Treatments for Cat Flu

The treatments for flu in cats vary on the kind of it.

  • Generalized Supportive Care. A lot of the treatment for flu in cats may be directed at the symptoms, as well as designed in proving a supportive care. The main goal is keeping the cat comfortable and let go of any troubling symptoms, for the cat to be able to fight the infection. Keep the nose and eyes clear of discharge via cleaning away the excess secretions, with the use of decongestants. It is also important to get the cat to drink and eat.
  • FCV. In the event that the cat has oral ulcers because of FCV, soft food is necessary. Furthermore, in case of corneal ulcers, the doctor might prescribe medications, which keep the pupils more dilated. The antibiotic ointment might also be used in preventing a secondary bacterial infection. Some cats that has FCV may show signs of lameness that may treated with corticosteroids or some other anti-inflammatories.
  • FHV. In case the testing identifies FHV as the main cause of cat flu, the doctor might choose in treating with an antiviral drug like acyclovir. This is in addition to the general supportive care.
  • Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, Bordetella causes. Antibiotics may be prescribed in treating bacterial causes of the flu in cats. Vets commonly choose wide-ranging antibiotics like amoxicillin, fluoroquinolones, or tetracycline with clavulanic acid. These are essential in killing the bacteria and prevent any secondary infections from any other bacteria. Remember: antibiotics must only be given 2 to 3 days after the end of the observable symptoms.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here